Inside tips from behind the bar

There are a few things you don’t learn at first: not exactly trade secrets, but great, insider knowledge for the advanced weekend bartender. Here are three of our most valuable tips.

Dry shake

When shaking a cocktail with egg white you really want the froth on the top to be thick. After adding all liquid ingredients to your shaker including the egg white, don’t yet add the ice. Instead seal your shaker and shake vigorously for a good five seconds. This is what we call a “dry shake,” and it gives the process of creating the frothy texture a head start. Now open the shaker, add the ice and shake even longer until your drink is chilled. Strain and serve!

Rimming a glass

Adding a rim might seem hard, but it’s actually easy -- and it can really add to the visual experience of a drink. This is how we do it: use a lime or lemon wedge to moisten the lip of your glass. Add the granulated product you want to use -- most commonly salt or sugar -- to cover a small plate. Add a light coat to your glass by slowly turning the glass around, hold the glass almost parallel to the plate. Get rid off any excess salt or sugar by shaking the glass. If you have the possibility always put your glasses in the freezer to chill, but do the rimming first.

Muddling

This is one of the most common techniques when making a bit more advanced cocktails. It’s not hard to learn, but we want to send along a few recommendations to make your muddled drinks even better. When muddling herbs, and especially mint, use a flat muddler (if you have a tooth designed muddler, flip it around and use top of the muddler). If you crush the mint it will release bitter flavors and your drink will be filled with small flakes that spoils the presentation. The tooth designed muddler is great when muddling fruits to get a better grip, but don’t muddle too hard: we just want to release the juices, not make a mash.

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Muddle